Thursday, March 24, 2016

That's All Well and Good


When a lady is asked, "How are you?", she replies, "I am well, thank you! How are you?"  

She does not say, "I'm good," because she correctly understands that to be a statement either about her virtue (I'm good, as opposed to evil) or about her ability (I'm talented, as opposed to incompetent.)  

Likewise, a lady does not use "I'm good" as a substitute for "No, thank you" in response to an offer for more of something. When asked, "Would you like more tea?" a lady doesn't say, "No, I'm good," when she means, "No, thank you."

Principle:  A lady knows the difference between well and good, and uses them correctly.

Photo: found on Pinterest

10 comments:

  1. Dear Miss Nancy:
    Thank you again for your gentle reminders on the correct way to speak and act. I enjoy your blog very, very much.
    Warm regards,
    Miss B.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Miss B., you are a sweet encourager. A very happy Easter to you!

      Delete
  2. Oh dear I use "good" .... not any more!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a lovely posture for learning you have, lady jicky ... and that is always more important than grammar!

      Delete
  3. Another wonderful and timely reminder, Nancy. I've been meaning to tell you for months now how much I look forward to each new post. I thoroughly enjoy your blog because it echoes the manners I was taught as a child.

    (Apropos of the last paragraph of this post - I vividly remember being pulled aside during one of my mother's many tea parties (at which my sister and I served the finger sandwiches and dessert squares... it was the '60's), and gently reminded that the polite hostess doesn't ask if a guest wants "more" of anything because that implies the guest is eating too much. Instead one asks if the guest would like "some" sandwiches, cookies, whatever. She said that each guest knows perfectly well how much or little she has eaten and using the word "more" might make some guests feel uncomfortable. To this day, I still don't always remember until I hear the word "more" slip past my lips. ...Then I see my mother, in my mind's eye, giving me a look of consternation. :) )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh how I love this story, Zénaide! I am so happy you shared it! <3

      Delete
  4. I am enjoying these posts very much. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Deborah, it means so much to me to hear from readers. Thanks for taking the time to let me know!

      Delete
  5. I dislike the changing expressions, and the I'm good culture. Instead, when asked if they need more tea or food, they should tell the hostess she is doing good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your comment makes me smile, Mrs. Sherman.

      Delete